Posts Tagged ‘dentistry’

Make Polling part of your Social Media strategy

Thursday 29th May 2014

‘Polling’ is a very powerful tool that dental practices can use as part of their social strategy (to market the practice).

Big brands often pay a lot of money to have outside services and companies survey customers to get product feedback. Others use social listening tools to see what people are saying about their products.

But dental practices can be more direct and go straight to patients on a social media channel.

Please see this (please just read ‘patients’ instead of ‘customers’):

http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2346906/5-Reasons-to-Include-Polling-in-Your-Social-Media-Strategy

The Difference Is In The Design

Thursday 22nd May 2014

When it comes to marketing your practice online, the quality of your website design is absolutely crucial. This is because like it nor not, we all make snap decisions that are formed in the first few seconds of viewing a website. If a website looks outdated and poorly laid out, our instinctive response is often to look elsewhere. Especially these days, in the age of smart phones and mobile devices, the savvy user will very quickly be able to make a judgement on the quality of a dental practice based on how the practice is presented online.

Whether this judgement is correct or not is another matter, but the fact is, if your website doesn’t look the part then you could be turning away literally hundreds of potential new patients who take one look at your practice website, and decide to search elsewhere.

So, how do you know if your website is letting you down? Ask yourself, are you proud of your practice website? How does it compare to your competitors’ sites? Do you feel confident in telling your friends, family and patients about your practice website? Do they react positively?

If the answer to any of these questions is no, then the chances are, your website isn’t working to its full potential. In short, it isn’t doing its job. To make the most of your practice’s online marketing efforts, your website really needs to look the part. It doesn’t just need to be well ordered, but it also needs to reflect your practice vision. If you run a boutique spa practice, then your website design needs to reflect this. Very often modern practices will tie their website design in with their other marketing material, with colours and styles matching those used in the practice design itself.

Once you’ve achieved the design you want, then that’s only the first hurdle. So you’ve managed to hold a user’s attention longer than a few seconds. It’s a good start, but there’s still a lot more work to do. This is because once a user has looked at your website as a whole, their next step will be to see exactly what it is you have to say.

Content is very important in online marketing, and just like the design itself, the text you present must reflect your practice and the way you run your business. Text copied from a generic source just doesn’t work – you need to encapsulate your practice vision in the written word just as much as you do in the practical design. The language you use should therefore be chosen very carefully. Don’t over-complicate things, but be careful not to patronise your readers.

To support your message, patient testimonials supported by ‘before and after’ photo galleries can be an excellent way of showing what you can offer to any potential new patient visiting your website. Remember, your website is a 24/7 shop window for your practice business. It works for you around the clock – even when you’re not working. If a someone has toothache and goes online to find their nearest dentist, will they find you? Or will they find you and then decide to look elsewhere?

Though you may not realise it, the better the design of your website and the quality of the text you display, the easier you will be to find on search engines such as Google. This is because Google has a very detailed ‘check list’ that it uses to determine where a website appears on search results. Though this check list is a closely guarded secret, as experienced marketing experts, here at Dental Focus ® we know that this check list includes factors such as quality of content, and also the amount of time users spend on your site. If someone visits you for example, then quickly goes elsewhere, that tells Google that your website isn’t very appealing, and so your website will be ranked further down the search results.

So what’s the solution? Well, the first thing is to make sure you have an exclusive website that works for you. The detail is very much in the design, and then in the content. Once you have a website that you can be proud of, and that you’re happy to share with your patients, talk about it! Encourage your patients to visit it, and share it with their friends. The more people you can get talking about your website, the better you will rank on Google, and the more patients you will attract as a result.

Make no mistake, marketing a dental practice online is no easy task, but it’s a task that can be made easier by working with an experienced online marketing team, with a proven track record of success in dentistry. The award winning team at Dental Focus ® have over 500 dental practices websites to their name, and thousands of page 1 results for natural (organic) search. To make your practice an online success, contact the experts today.

For more information call 020 7183 8388, or visit www.dental-focus.com

The Difference Between A Brand And An Identity.

Friday 21st March 2014

 

A brand is how your patients “feel” about your practice:

It creates an emotional bond between your patients and your treatments. Think of it as the ‘essence’ of your practice. What’s more, branding is a gradual process that develops over time and is dependent on the beliefs and opinions of your patients. It’s an experience, a feeling and an impression. Obviously, it’s within your control to offer a wonderful service and an amazing patient experience. But, at the end of the day, only your patients can determine how they feel about your practice.

An identity is how your business is “dressed:”

Your identity is everything that your patient “sees and hears” about your practice. It’s the accumulation of all your visual and audio elements.  Unlike your brand, your identity is completely within your control and can be established quite quickly. There are numerous elements of your small business identity including:

– The name of your practice

– Your marketing message or slogan

– Your logo

– Your colours

 

To read more on this topic, please see this link:

http://www.sitepronews.com/2014/03/18/whats-difference-small-business-branding-identity/?utm_source=newsletter+-+2014-03-19&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Article%2BUpdate

Web Traffic

Saturday 8th March 2014

 

Did you know humans account for less than 40% of global web traffic?

Bringing traffic to your site is important, but then engaging with some of that traffic is crucial. This is especially true since over half the recorded visits to a site may not even be by a human.

Statistics show they are by ‘bots’ etc and the ‘bots’ presumably will not ever require dentistry. So instead we concentrate our efforts on relating to the ‘human’, emotional concerns of the 40% who are real people and interested in dental health. That is why, not only do we Search Engine Optimize our dental websites, we also emotionally relate to the ‘humans’, by featuring content that will engage them.

See the chart showing the statistics:

http://www.sitepronews.com/2014/03/07/humans-account-less-40-global-web-traffic

Improving Dental Care and Oral Health

Thursday 27th February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Dentistry was one of the founding pillars of the NHS at its inception in 1948, and NHS dental services have made a significant contribution to the improvement in the nation’s oral health since that time.”

We have a growing population with a longer life expectancy; therefore patients’ expectations for their dental care are higher. Dental patients are becoming a lot more sophisticated, as they have their own idea about what quality care means, and when and how they receive it.

Barry Cockcroft CBE, NHS England’s Chief Dental Officer and an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of General Dental Practice outlines how the world of dental care has changed in a recent article published on NHS England’s news page.

One of the many interesting points outlined in this article is are we aware of the contribution that dentists now make in identifying people at risk of diseases such as oral cancers?

To read the article, please see: http://www.england.nhs.uk/2014/02/19/dental-care-cta/

Online, offline, inbound and outbound dental marketing – just contact Dental Focus: www.dentalfocus.com

SEO Blogging for Dentists

Thursday 7th November 2013

I often get clients asking me how they can write blogs for SEO and what they should be doing. To address this, this month’s article is about SEO Blogging.

Google is a big fan of blogging and loves fresh content on your website. When Google sees you adding content on a regular basis, it sees you as a frequent advocator of your topic. And when Google sees people visiting your articles and spending time viewing them, it can tell Google you’re an influential advocator. If you get a big enough following, Google will consider you as the go-to person your visitor’s location (for local SEO).

Blog articles tend to be read and stored in Google’s memory faster than web pages. With the new Hummingbird update, they’ve become even more important as good articles directly answer search queries. Suffice to say, I could write an article on the benefits of blogging alone. But today I want to discuss how Dentists can blog.

Initially Dentists should be following these core rules:

– Article content needs to be a minimum of 350 words
– Article should contain an image
– Keyword and location (if used) should be in the title and appear in the body of the article
– The article should never be discussing more than 2 treatments ever. When 2 treatments are used they should ideally be semantically linked i.e. Ortho and Invisalign
– The core keywords should appear as high up as possible and link to the relevant treatment page to help deliver on the user’s search
– Content should be unique – absolute minimal duplication of text
– Do not overuse a keyword – max 2-3% occurrence in the article (remember to use semantically related words)
– Try to create articles to cater to 3 common types of searches

1. Informational – Patient FAQ on the treatment
2. Navigational – Article about your practice, the history, the plans, competitions etc
3. Transactional – Promote competitions the value of your services and pricing

I recommend creating a story out of a testimonial (providing you have the patients consent) to cater to one of the 3 searches.
For example:

Patient X’s success in choosing Dental Implants in Glasgow.

Dental Implants GlasgowPatient x for a number of years had suffered from missing teeth. They’d struggled with certain types of food and had to eliminate xyz from their staple diet. They had considered dental implants in Glasgow but were unsure where to go. They were concerned with finding a trusted dentist and had spent a long time considering their options. Through word of mouth they found out about Dr Philip Friel at Philip Friel Advanced Dentistry. They carried out their research online and were happy with the evidence and testimonials so they contacted Philip 3 weeks ago.

From the initial call they had a consultation booked in with Philip to discuss their Teeth replacement needs and options.

Create a story which can show that each patient is unique, their experience and story, why did they wait so long for the treatment, why did they choose you? Add a small testimonial from them. Did they travel across the globe for you? Did they experience anything above and beyond the call of duty, would they recommend you to anyone?

Use these points to create a compelling story to satisfy your potential patient’s queries and answer the questions they may be searching though Google for. I’m sure a question could be how many times can I spin a story? Well with a bit of practice, creativity and building rapport with clients, you should be able to create good SEO blog articles.

Dental Implants: Showcasing Quality, Value and Service (QVS) in your online showroom.

Monday 21st October 2013

If your website doesn’t highlight QVS, I can guarantee your competitor’s does.

So let’s talk about converting dental implant visitors to dental implant patients, remember you need both Q, V and S to provide the complete patient journey.

1. Quality

With any surgical procedure, quality comes down to success rate and clinical standards. So boast your success

“We have performed over 200 dental implants with a 95% success rate!”

Statements reassure nervous patients, and quantify success to those looking for the very best dental implant treatment available, numbers speak volumes in terms of consumer trust.

Make sure your website tells visitors that you are qualified and experienced, have an image of yourself, your qualifications, your extra-curricular training and most importantly, your passion for dental implants. If you love what you do, patients will want you to look after them.

Don’t be afraid to show off, this is not ‘push’ marketing, visitors have come to your website, show them before and after images that will instil confidence in them, a smile gallery is a great tool to achieve this.

Finally, make sure your website is GDC compliant! Patients will not be impressed by a website that falls short of basic clinical guidelines. Find out more about website compliance here.

2. Value

If you don’t have your dental implant fees online, forget about it. Online shoppers are not interested in finding out more by calling or coming into the practice, they want all the information to make a buying decision upfront.

However, your fees should represent your value proposition, think Virgin Holidays Vs. Ryanair, make sure visitors know what they are paying for and what they are getting fromtheir dental implant treatment with you. See two great examples of how you can break down the value of your dental implant treatment here and here.

Offer payment options? Put this on your homepage, fees page and dental implants page, even better, have a payment options page! Offering flexible payment solutions for dental implant treatment empowers consumers to make informed decisions and is an additional consideration as part of the buying decision.

Price is one dimensional, value is something that should jump up off the page!

3. Service

Struggle to highlight service on your website? Easy.

What do your existing patients say about their dental implant treatment with you? Let potential patients know by providing testimonials on your website, word of mouth is one thing, word from mouth another.

Patient care may not be tangible, but by patients describing their own experiences, visitors will be able to relate and trust your service.

Back this up with images and information about your practice facilities, let visitors see what they will experience in your care, the comfort on offer and clinical standards your maintain will all contribute to the decision process.

Finally, present the patient journey, from consultation through to a 12 month sign off, patients want to feel as though their dental implant treatment is a relationship with your practice, not a simple transaction.

There you have it, some great ideas to boost dental implant conversion through your website, why don’t you get in touch with Dental Focus, we create websites for YOUR profit.

 

Facebook: To ad or not to ad?

Wednesday 21st August 2013

In a move that may deter some of its users, Facebook is planning to add video advertisements to its website. With companies like YouTube already having this integrated, by having short video clips shown before users can view the video they have searched for, it seems as though this is becoming more popular. With Facebook about to start, it raises the question how long before other social network sites will start to follow?

Although users may not find this the best news, it seems that Facebook has its reasons to make the decision according to a new report released by Morgan Stanley. The report predicts the advertisements will soon bring in an estimated $1 billion and by the year 2020, Facebook could be raking in as much as $6.5 billion per year. A clear increase in profit for Facebook.

It is looking to be a slow start for the adverts to be fully added to Facebook, as reports show that the ads will start out in the U.S later this year. They then plan to hit European users in the later part of 2014 and will continue to reach different parts worldwide slowly. It is almost certain there will be different opinions emerging as the advertisements reach different parts.

With Facebook being used more frequently in today’s society, particularly with the rise of smartphones having apps available for these sites, no doubt users are going to be wondering what differences they will see on different devices and how much Facebook is going to change for them.

For more information on the ads coming to Facebook, including what will users see when they are on Facebook, and the first reactions on this idea, we are providing you with the following published article.

 

http://www.sitepronews.com/2013/08/09/facebook-expected-to-rake-in-1-billion-from-video-ads-in-2014/?utm_source=newsletter+-+2013-08-10&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Article%2BUpdate

 

RICHARD III’s DENTISTRY

Wednesday 19th June 2013

Not so long ago, Richard III was in the news, as they found his body under a car park in Leicester. But what was not immediately in the news, was the state of his teeth.

It appears that he was anxious and fearful (I wonder why?), just as Shakespeare had portrayed him. Investigation into his oral health showed surface loss on a number of back teeth and upper right teeth, suggesting that he suffered from stress-related bruxism, or teeth grinding. Also the king suffered severe tooth decay, possibly as a result of his privileged position and his sweet tooth.

In the British Dental Journal, it says that the monarch’s teeth and jaw showed rudimentary signs of medieval dentistry while some of the teeth showed signs of decay from a diet rich in carbohydrates and sugar. Dentistry from this era was largely based around herbal remedies, amulets and charms, and toothache was a serious and common problem. There are, however, references in many Medieval texts indicating that surgeries were performed on sufferers of oral cancer, fractures and dislocations. Indeed, there is evidence that Richard III underwent dental surgery and had two teeth removed at the hands of a barber surgeon. Nonetheless, despite surgical intervention, it was acknowledged that, in the case of more serious ailments, the only hope of a cure was prayer or pilgrimage.

Whilst common remedies for toothaches began with instructions such as “Get an iron nail and engrave the following words theron, + agla + Sabaoth + athanatos + and insert the nail under the affected tooth…” You can’t help but think many may have preferred prayer for the less serious cases, too!

Apparently further analysis of the tartar found on the teeth in the King’s upper jaw, is due to identify the strains of bacteria in Richard’s mouth and tell us about his diet and oral hygiene. Watch this space, as the teeth discovered by people today continue to tell us about the world of those who lived long before us.